The course of study at St. Patrick-St. Vincent High School is predominantly college preparatory. However, not all students desiring a Catholic education plan to go to a four-year college or a community college. Efforts are made to direct a student into a program consistent with the capacity and potential of the student. In some cases, students may be encouraged to pursue non-academic careers. Yet all students will be exposed to ample opportunity to discover and develop their true educational potential.

Curriculum

Business and Technology

6595 COMPUTING WITH ROBOTICS

This introductory class focuses on integrating computing and robotics with hands-on project-based learning. Students will be introduced to innovative computing and robotics technologies with C-STEM Studio and RoboBlockly and the programming languages of C/C++.

This course is based on curriculum provided by UC Davis C-Stem Center’s Computing with Robotics. Starting in 2018, this course will serve as an entrance requirement for AP Computer Science.

Prerequisites: None. Open to grades 10, 11, and 12. Subject to sufficient enrollment.

6600 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE

This course is an introductory, college-level course in computer science class. A large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs that correctly solve a given problem. These computer programs should be understandable, adaptable, and, when appropriate, reusable. The design and implementation of computer programs is used as a context for introducing other important aspects of computer science, including the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the study of standard algorithms and typical applications, and the use of logic and formal methods. The responsible use of these systems is an integral part of the course.

Prerequisites: C+ or higher in Geometry and Algebra I, C+ or higher in English. Open to grades 11 and 12. Subject to sufficient enrollment.

9680 VIDEO EDITING

Video Editing class will introduce important skills applied to professional video editing. Picture composition, camera movement, lighting and sound recording, electronic news gathering (ENG), and professional editing processes will be featured. Projects include music video, interview, instructional video, and narrative video. Students will also learn proper script writing process.

Prerequisites: None. Open to grades 10, 11 and 12. Subject to sufficient enrollment.

9695 STUDIO PRODUCTION

Studio Production will continue the Video Editing curriculum into a more practical application. Students in Studio Productions will research write, shoot, and edit videos for a variety of purposes. Students will also be involved in local news broadcast production revolving around school events, and other potential commissioned events that arise. Studio Production will also allow creative projects that support other curricula and programs on SPSV campus. Can be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: C or better in Video Editing

6580 PERSONAL FINANCES

Personal Finance is designed to help students make informed decisions about real world financial issues. This course will give students the tools and resources needed to make wise financial decisions. Students will analyze their personal financial decisions, evaluate the costs and benefits of their decisions, recognize their rights and responsibilities as consumers, and apply the knowledge learned to financial situations encountered later in life. Students will design personal and household budgets and simulate the use of checking and saving accounts. They will be able to demonstrate a solid understanding of investment, debt, and credit management, as well as apartment rental/ lease agreements, practices and policies. Students will gain a solid understanding of car, home and health insurance policies and practices while learning to be a savvy consumer and price shop. There will be a focus on learning the different types of income and payroll taxes, and students will practice how to properly complete and successfully file IRS form 1040EZ and State of California income taxes.

Prerequisites: None. Open to grades 11 and 12. Subject to sufficient enrollment.

6560 21st CENTURY MARKETING*

This course is designed as an introduction to business management across all functional areas of an organization to meet the needs for a solid understanding of marketing fundamentals to succeed. Marketing allows students to discover customer wants and needs, and to gain a solid understanding in creating, advertising, and selling products. This course offers all aspects of marketing, from basic economics to employment in the marketing field. Students will learn how marketing affects many aspects of their lives and how they will benefit from understanding it.

Students in marketing learn how to apply economic and human resources and marketing functions and foundations to solve business problems and develop competence in such areas as product/service planning, selling, pricing, risk management, promotion, and information management. The key concepts covered in this course are: Marketing, Economics, Business & International Marketing, Communication Skills, Selling, Promotion, Distribution, and Pricing. This is especially important in today’s economy, since the significance of a “marketing orientation” for both profit and non-profit organizations is widely recognized in today’s global business environment and gives students the upper edge over their competitors.

Prerequisites: None. Open to grades 10, 11 and 12. Subject to sufficient enrollment.

6585 EXPLORING COMPUTER SCIENCE

In this course students will have the opportunity to create projects using computer based technologies in areas such as multimedia web design, object oriented Java programming and robotics. Students learn the fundamentals of web design using HTML, CSS, Java and Photoshop to create web pages. The programming portion of the class will provide an introduction to the Java programming language and will serve as preparation for the student who wants to take the AP Computer Science class. Students will also learn the basics of robotics by creating robots and programming them using Java.

Prerequisites: 9th Grade Elective; space available for grades 10-12

English

Year A
(2017-2018)
(2019-2020)

Year B
(2018-2019)
(2020-2021)

AP English Language and Composition
AP English Literature and Composition
The American Dream (P)
College Reading & Writing (P)
Modern British Literature (P)
Stories of Life (P)

AP English Language and Composition
AP English Literature and Composition
College Reading & Writing (P)
Literary Environments (P)
The Odyssey of Youth (P)
World Classics (P)

1110 Fundamental College Prep ENGLISH I

This course strives to address weaknesses in basic language arts skills; the primary focus is to build reading comprehension and written expression skills. Students practice active reading skills and read grade level material. Writing instruction addresses a variety of writing traits. Students learn and practice the writing process in their efforts to develop their writing skills. Students study and practice formal oral presentation skills. Students begin their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: English I is required of all Freshman

1111 College Prep ENGLISH I

This course addresses the on-going development of reading, writing, and communication skills of students who possess a solid foundation in language arts. Students read a wide variety of literature and study traditional and innovative literary forms and structures. Students learn and practice the writing process in their efforts to develop their writing skills. Students study and practice large- and small-group discussion skills to develop their oral communication abilities. This course seeks to advance critical thinking skills and to explore the relevance of material in a modern context. Students begin their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: English I is required of all Freshman

1112 Accelerated College Prep ENGLISH I

This challenging course includes elements currently found in CP English I but explores the material in more depth and at an accelerated pace. The main goal of this course is for students to advance their language arts skills.

Students read a wide variety of literature and study traditional and innovative literary forms and structures. Students learn and practice the writing process in their efforts to develop their writing skills and study and practice large and small group discussion skills to develop their oral communication abilities. This course seeks to advance critical thinking skills and to explore the relevance of material in a modern context. Students begin their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: English I is required of all Freshman.

1209 Fundamental College Prep ENGLISH II

This course builds on the foundation achieved in FCP English I. It continues to address weaknesses in basic language arts skills; students continue to practice the writing process and specific reading strategies with the expectation to integrate these skills in their reading and writing assignments across the curriculum. Students study all genres of literature and are exposed to appropriately challenging grade level material. Writing instruction continues to emphasize paragraphing and essay writing skills. Students study and practice formal oral presentation skills and continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: FCP English I.

1210 College Prep ENGLISH II

This course continues to expose students to a wide variety of literature and to develop the basic language arts skills of reading comprehension, writing, oral communication, and critical thinking. Students’ writing instruction continues to use the writing process with the expectation that students continue to integrate this process into their approach to writing assignments across the curriculum. Students practice and integrate reading strategies to continue to build their reading comprehension skills. Students continue to develop their oral communications skills through both large and small group discussions and through formal presentations. Students exhibit an appropriate level of sophistication and complexity in their critical thinking skills and continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: CP English I.

1211 Honors English II

This challenging course includes elements currently found in CP English II but explores the material in more depth and may use more challenging texts. The main goal of this course is for students to advance their language arts skills in preparation for advanced studies in the junior and senior years. Students read a wide variety of classic and modern literature and study traditional and innovative literary forms and structures. Students continue to practice the writing process but are also expected to integrate the process into their approach to writing across the curriculum. Students are expected to read and write independently and to integrate reading and writing strategies in their efforts to develop their reading and writing skills. This course seeks to advance critical thinking skills and to explore the relevance of material in a modern context. Students continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: A B or better in ACP English I.

*UC approval pending.

1514 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

Offered to both juniors and seniors, this AP course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subject, as well as the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. (College Board, 2009) Students also continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA in English, PSAT/ AP Potential status. A teacher recommendation may be used to provide context for GPA or PSAT data.

1414 AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

Offered to both juniors and seniors, this course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. (College Board, 2009) Students also continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: 3.0 GPA in English, PSAT/ AP Potential status. A teacher recommendation may be used to provide context for GPA or PSAT data.

1435 THE AMERICAN DREAM

Students explore the concept of the American Dream from its beginnings through its evolution in modern society. This focus helps inform students about the origins of American culture and guides them as they read novels, short stories, poetry, and essays that explore the experiences of various groups. Students examine the historical contexts of readings as they explore the themes of freedom, justice, sacrifice, and citizenship. Through essays, discussions, multimedia projects, and an oral history project, students also explore cultural values of various populations and the influence these values have on an individual character’s pursuit of the American Dream. Students also continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and English II. Students may take this course only once. Open to both juniors and seniors.

1445 COLLEGE READING AND WRITING

This course is designed to help students who are likely to need additional support in English before enrolling in college level courses at a CSU campus. Senior international students (ELL) and seniors who need extra support in reading and writing skills are required to take this course in the first semester of their senior year. The course assignments emphasize the in-depth study of expository, analytical, and argumentative reading and writing. Students also continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and English II. Students may take this course only once. Open only to seniors.

1431 MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE

Modern British Literature provides an overview of the British literary experience from the Romantic era until the end of the twentieth century. As students study different authors, they will learn about Romantic traditions, Victorian values, and modernist ideas. You will also learn about the impact of world events, such as World War I, World War II, and the growing desire for independence in the British colonies. This course, in short, will provide an overview of two hundred years of British culture. Students further their understanding of the historical development of English literature as they read selections by major authors of the Romantic age, the Victorian era and the 20th century. They apply and improve their writing skills as they analyze the many facets of the literary selections they read. Students also continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and English II. Students may take this course only once. Open to both juniors and seniors.

1440 STORIES OF LIFE

This course focuses on the life stories of a variety of historical and modern day figures. The goal of the course is to develop a deeper understanding of the nature of human beings. Students investigate cultural and historical influences affecting the people studied. Students study the writing styles and techniques of authors in order to learn how to develop personal writing skills. In addition, students practice personal writing skills by creating original compositions (interviews, and biographical and autobiographical texts). Students continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and English II. Students may take this course only once. Open to both juniors and seniors.

1425 LITERARY ENVIRONMENTS

This course explores the powerful connection between human beings and their environment. Students explore this relationship in a variety of contexts, including cultural, political, and social, through the reading of poems, essays, short stories, magazines, book-length exposés, and instructional articles. This course incorporates a service-learning component which requires students participate in both on campus and off-campus service in the local community. Students create a digital journal to record their observations and reflections of the impact environments have on human beings. Students write expository and persuasive essays exploring historical and current-day topics addressing the relationship between the individual and his environment. Students also continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and English II. Students may take this course only once. Open to both juniors and seniors.

1420 THE ODYSSEY OF YOUTH

Students taking this course explore the challenging experiences that cause them to grow into adults. Students read both classic and modern texts, novels, short stories, and dramas. Students analyze the influence of culture on the lives of young people, compare and contrast choices of characters and their situations, consider options, and analyze how this universal process is adapted in modern society. Students actively engage in classroom and online discussions of themes and issues explored in the various texts. Students also continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and English II. Students may take this course only once. Open to both juniors and seniors.

1430 WORLD CLASSICS

This course explores a variety of texts that have stood the test of time and have remained relevant to human experiences. Students develop an understanding of the elements of the readings that make them timeless: universal themes, elegance and/or rawness of style, and imaginative use of language, to name a few. Students write essays of literary analysis and exposition and participate in a variety of formal and informal discussion forums. In addition, students regularly follow current events and demonstrate their ability to connect classic texts to real-world situations and human experiences. Students also continue their study of vocabulary using the online tool Membean.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of English I and English II. Students may take this course only once. Open to both juniors and seniors.

Mathematics

2120 ALGEBRA IA

This is the first-year course of a two-year program. It covers the first half of Algebra I and is designed for those students whose placement scores indicate they would benefit from spending more time with newly learned algebra skills. Topics explored include real numbers, functions, equation-solving, inequalities, and problemsolving.

Prerequisites: Enrollment determined by Mathematics scores on the placement test and departmental approval.

2220 ALGEBRA IB

This is the second year of a two-year program. It covers the second half of Algebra I. Topics explored include polynomials and factoring, linear functions, exponents and exponential functions, quadratic functions and equations, radical expressions and equations, and rational expressions.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

2112 ALGEBRA I

This standard course in first-year algebra includes a study of real numbers, solving equations and inequalities, functions, systems of equations and inequalities. Additional topics explored include factoring, exponents and exponential functions, quadratic functions and equations, radical expressions and equations, and rational expressions. Data analysis and probability may be introduced.

Prerequisites: Enrollment determined by scores on the Math department placement test and departmental approval.

2140 Accelerated MATHEMATICS I

This is the first-year course of a four-year honors program designed for students with exceptional abilities and backgrounds in mathematics. It includes the main topics of Algebra I and selected topics from Geometry that include and introduction to points, lines, planes, and angles, deductive reasoning, and parallel lines and planes.

Prerequisites: Enrollment determined by scores on the Math department placement test, grades in previous SPSV math classes and departmental approval.

2212 GEOMETRY

This standard course will introduce logical thinking by proving geometric figures parallel, congruent, or similar. The theorems and postulates concerning lines, triangles, polygons, and circles will be explained while learning properties about each kind of figure. Reasoning techniques will be applied in creating proofs that support logical progression of thought and reasoning. Other topics explored include area for plane figures, areas and volumes for three dimensional figures, the use of trigonometric functions for solving triangular measurement, as well as theoretical probability in determining random outcomes.

Prerequisites: C- or higher in Algebra I or successful completion of Algebra IB.

2314 ALGEBRA II

This course reviews topics from Algebra I , covers the standard areas of study for Algebra II, and prepares students for trigonometry and analytic geometry. Topics explored are expressions, equations, inequalities, factoring, functions of various kinds, graphing of linear and nonlinear functions, linear systems, rational exponents, and probability and statistics.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry and departmental approval.

2312 ALGEBRA II-TRIGONOMETRY

This course covers the standard Algebra II topics such as expressions, equations, inequalities, factoring, functions of various kinds, graphing of linear and nonlinear functions, linear systems, rational exponents, and probability and statistics. In addition, other topics explored are exponential and logarithmic functions, quadratic relations and conic sections, periodic functions and trigonometry, and trigonometric identities and equations.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in two semesters of Algebra I , B- or higher in two semesters of Geometry , and departmental approval.

2411 ADVANCED MATHEMATICS

This course introduces analytic geometry, trigonometric and circular functions, and identities. It also covers the use of limits. There is special emphasis in Advanced Trigonometry and functional analysis that will be needed to be successful in future courses in Mathematics.

Prerequisites: C- or higher in Algebra II and departmental approval.

2425 STATISTICS

This course introduces the fundamental ideas of probability and statistics. That includes exploring data, sampling experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inferences. Topics include graphical and numerical representations of distributions, sampling techniques, confidence intervals, and regression.

Prerequisites: C- or higher in Algebra II and departmental approval

2412 PRE-CALCULUS

This course presents concepts necessary to begin the study of calculus: functional analysis, analytic geometry, trigonometry, limits, polar coordinates, and some topics in discrete mathematics. There is special emphasis in Advanced Trigonometry and functional analysis that will be needed to be successful in Calculus.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in Algebra II/Trigonometry and departmental approval.

2413 INTRODUCTORY ANALYSIS HONORS (HP)

This is the third-year course of a four-year honors program. It includes trigonometric and circular functions and identities, analytic geometry, functional analysis, polar coordinates and limits, and prepares students for AP Calculus (HP). There is special emphasis in Advanced Trigonometry and functional analysis that will be needed to be successful in Calculus.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in Honors Mathematics II or departmental approval.

9611 AP STATISTICS (HP)

This comprehensive full-year course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. That includes exploring data, sampling, experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inferences. This course allows students to qualify for college credit through the Advanced Placement test in Statistics.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in Algebra II-Trigonometry and departmental approval OR successful completion of AP Calculus.

2414 AP CALCULUS (HP)

This is a comprehensive full-year course in differential and integral calculus of real functions. Emphasis is placed on applications and problem analysis. This course allows students to qualify for college credit through the Advanced Placement Calculus Test (AB Test or BC Test).

Prerequisites: B- or higher in Introductory Analysis Honors (HP) and departmental approval.

2140 Accelerated MATHEMATICS II

This is the second-year course of a four-year honors program. It includes the topics in Geometry not covered in Honors Mathematics I such as congruent triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, trigonometric functions for solving right triangles, circles, areas of plane figures, and areas and volumes of solids. Reasoning techniques will also be applied in creating proofs that support logical progression of thought and reasoning. During the second semester, topics in Algebra II with the exception of analytic geometry and trigonometry will be explored.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in Honors Mathematics I or departmental approval.

Physical Education

Year A
(2017-2018)
(2019-2020)

Year B
(2018-2019)
(2020-2021)

Core Pilates and Yoga I & II
Cross-fit I & II
Recreational Basketball I & II
Weight and Conditioning I & II

Core Pilates and Yoga I & II
Lifetime Sports I & II
Walk and Run for Fun I & II
Weight and Conditioning I & II

8110 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1 & HEALTH

During Physical Education emphasis is placed on cardiovascular, strength, and coordination development with proper bio-mechanics. Some sports and activities include agility drills, athletic stance, basketball, conditioning, flag football, fitness testing, juggling, softball, soccer, and track and field. IPads will be used in a variety of ways such as to record student performance, capture images, watch instructional videos, track progress of results from fitness tests and for Schoology access.

Health class is divided into six categories; emotional, environmental, mental, physical, social and spiritual. While exploring these categories, students will use the decision-making process in topics including, but not limited to family/peer relationships, nutrition, self-esteem development, sustainable living and values. IPads will be used for the on-line ebook, to connect to various internet resources, creating research documents and for Schoology access.

Prerequisites: Not applicable.

9649 CORE PILATES AND YOGA I & II

This one semester course will introduce students to beginning Pilates and Yoga exercises. The goal is to reinforce the long-term advantages of being physically fit and to promote the importance of core strength & flexibility. Students will work towards designing individual workouts. Activities will focus on beginning Pilates exercises and beginning yoga stretches.

Prerequisites: 10th grade Physical Education elective. Grades 11 and 12, space permitting.

9630 CROSS FIT I & II

This one semester course is a mixture of Olympic and power lifting with other compound functional movements designed for shorter, higher intensity strength training. Group and partner workouts include multiple, diverse and randomized physical challenges that will be timed and/or scored. Students are required to download the following free app to their IPad: Pocket WOD.

Prerequisites: 10th grade Physical Education elective. Grades 11 and 12, space permitting.

9644 RECREATIONAL BASKETBALL I & II

This one semester course introduces students to the possibilities of basketball as a life-long physical fitness activity. There are individual, dual and group drills and games. It incorporates individual as well as team development. IPads will be used to record student performance, to watch instructional videos and for Schoology access to class updates, notes and quizzes.

Prerequisites: 10th grade Physical Education elective. Grades 11 and 12, space permitting.

9615 WEIGHTLIFTING AND CONDITIONING I

This one semester course is designed as an introduction to develop the fundamentals and skills of basic weightlifting and conditioning. Emphasis will be placed on the individual development of a weightlifting and conditioning program that will assist the student to reach personal goals pertaining to their physical health. Workouts may include circuit training, Olympic lifting and Cross-fit exercises. This class will address losing/gaining weight and dealing with muscle mass and tone. IPads will be used to record student performance, create workout plans, to watch instructional videos and for Schoology access to class updates, notes and quizzes.

Prerequisites: 10th grade Physical Education elective. Grades 11 and 12, space permitting.

9616 WEIGHTLIFTING AND CONDITIONING II

This one semester course is designed as an introduction to develop the fundamentals and skills of advanced weightlifting and conditioning. Emphasis will be placed on the individual development of a weightlifting and conditioning program that will assist the student to reach personal goals pertaining to their physical health. Workouts may include supersets, partials, forced repetitions, isometric training, prioritization, periodization and light/heavy training. This class will address losing/gaining weight, muscle mass/tone and nutrition. IPads will be used to record student performance, create workout plans, to watch instructional videos and for Schoology access to class updates, notes and quizzes.

Prerequisites: Instructor approval. 10th grade Physical Education elective. Grades 11 and 12, space permitting.

9614 LIFETIME ACTIVITIES I & II

This one semester course will reinforce the long-term advantages of being physically fit and to promote the social and family aspects of sports. Indoor sports and activities include badminton, basketball, cardio kickboxing, dance, dodge ball, floor hockey, juggling, Tai-Chi, Pilates, soccer, and yoga. Outdoor sports and activities include circuit training, pickle ball, soccer, softball, tennis and Ultimate Frisbee. Students are required to download the following app to their IPad: Daily Workouts FREE.

Prerequisites: 10th grade Physical Education elective. Grades 11 and 12, space permitting.

9635 WALK AND RUN FOR FUN

This one semester course will focus on walking and running activities to raise student heart rates to an individually determined THRZ (Target Heart Rate Zone). Activities include walking and running different routes, hiking and cross country trails. Students are required to download the following free apps to their IPad: Map My Walk and Running and Walking with Endomondo. If students have a smartphone, it is recommended to download the following free app: Charity Miles.

Prerequisites: 10th grade Physical Education elective. Grades 11 and 12, space permitting.

Religious Studies

160 CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES

This course provides a foundation for the study of religion at the Catholic high school level. Students develop a general knowledge and appreciation of the Christian Scriptures, both the Old and New Testaments. In the course, students learn to read and understand biblical texts, the major sections of the Bible, and important themes and people found in the stories. This class invites students to build community and discover new things about themselves and what they want out of high school and life in general.

Prerequisites: Required of all Freshman.

170 THE MYSTERY OF JESUS

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of revelation and mystery as they relate to the Christian understanding of the nature of God. Special focus is given to the person of Jesus. In learning about who God is and the manner in which Jesus invites us to live our lives, students learn who He calls them to be. Students will read the Scriptures through the lens of the contextualist, leading to a fuller appreciation of the Revelation of God found in our sacred writings.

Prerequisites: Required of all Freshman.

150 INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION

This introductory course for students in the International Program seeks to provide a framework for further study of religion at SPSV. This course introduces students to concepts related to religious belief and practice with emphasis on the Catholic Christian perspective. The course will cover topics of the existence and nature of God, particularly as revealed in the Judeo-Christian story of Scripture; the person and mission of Jesus; the continuing mission of the Church; the expression of faith in prayer, worship, and Sacraments; and our life in Christ (morality, decision making, and social justice).

Prerequisites: Students must be enrolled in the International Program.

180 THE MISSION OF JESUS

In this course students explore the cultural and historical context, the content, and the purpose of the New Testament as they uncover and reflect upon the meaning of Jesus’ teachings as interpreted by various New Testament writers. Students will carefully consider and study the Gospels to appreciate the Good News shown through Jesus words and actions. This means to be a disciple of Christ, one incorporates Gospel values into one’s very identity as a man or woman of character and compassion.

Prerequisites: Required of all Sophomores.

190 THE MISSION OF THE CHURCH

The purpose of this course is to help students understand that in and through the Church they encounter the living Jesus Christ. They are introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by him through the Holy Spirit. The students come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today. This Body has both divine and human elements. In this course, students learn not so much about events in the life of the Church, but about the sacred nature of the Church.

Prerequisites: Required of all Sophomores.

325 SACRAMENTS AND THE SPIRITUAL LIFE

The purpose of this course is to help students understand that they can encounter Christ today in a full and real way in and through the Sacraments and prayer (both personal and communal). The course explores various spiritualties that have helped people respond to the invitation to live as God’s children and their own faith journey. The ritual Sacraments will be explored as they relate to Jesus’ public ministry and as encounters of grace.

Prerequisites: Required of all Juniors.

310 CHRISTIAN MORALITY

This course immerses students in the practice of Christian morality. The Christian understanding of the human person and Jesus’ command to love our God and serve one another is the foundation for our exploration of the moral life. Students focus on the study of the Ten Commandments and Jesus’ teaching and example--especially in the Beatitudes--as scriptural guides for our life and our moral choices. The course will include discussion of topics such as character, virtues, and values.

As part of the course students will participate in an immersion program at St. Anthony Foundation.

Prerequisites: Required of all Juniors.

320 SOCIAL JUSTICE

This course introduces students to the principles of Catholic social teaching and calls upon students to apply these to various social issues. Students are challenged to embrace the foundational social justice principle that affirms the dignity of all human persons, exploring controversial issues such as poverty and economic justice, life issues, and prejudice. Students are given the opportunity to reflect on the impact that Catholic social teaching can have on our world today and learn to take action in response to local and global social injustices. Required of all seniors.

Prerequisites: Required of all Seniors.

450 HEALTH CARE ETHICS

Health Care Ethics is a one semester course designed to introduce students to the discipline of bioethics and encourage students to engage in an active exploration of ethical issues often encountered in the healthcare field. The goal of the class is to develop students' skills in critical thinking, ethical decision-making, and philosophical analysis. Students will be expected to formulate and present their ideas and reflect on the relationship between moral, professional, and legal obligations of health care practitioners. This course is designed to provide a strong foundation for students pursuing a medical pathway in a variety of health care disciplines.

Prerequisites: Senior elective.

440 WORLD RELIGIONS

This course allows students to develop and expand their knowledge of the major religious belief systems of the world. Students explore the many ways humans have expressed a spiritual hunger and sought to satisfy this hunger in the context of their particular culture. The course will include the study of fundamental beliefs, holy days, rituals, and ethics of the major Eastern religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikh, e.g.) and Western religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam).

Prerequisites: Senior elective.

Sciences

3135 EARTH SCIENCE

This course covers the formation and history of the universe, the solar system, and the earth. Topics covered include astronomy, plate tectonics, oceanography, meteorology, physics, chemistry, and environmental science. Scientific methods and critical-thinking are developed through hands-on activities. Current events and technological advancements that affect the earth are emphasized in the course.

Prerequisites: None

3212 BIOLOGY

This course covers the major biological concepts that include chemistry, cytology, microbiology, genetics, taxonomy, ecology, anatomy, physiology, and evolution. Students work on a critical-thinking approach to problem- solving through the use of the scientific method and hands-on instruction. Students are required to perform laboratory experiments and exercises and acknowledge the technological advancements that are constantly changing the lives of those on Earth.

Prerequisites: Placement test results or successful completion of Earth Science.

9652 ACCELERATED BIOLOGY

This course covers the major biological concepts that include chemistry, cytology, microbiology, genetics, taxonomy, ecology, anatomy, physiology, and evolution. Students work on a critical-thinking approach to problem-solving through the use of the scientific method and hands-on instruction Students are required to perform extensive laboratory experiments and exercises and to acknowledge the technological advancements that are constantly changing on earth. The course is fast-paced and outside reading and extensive projects are required. This course is available to freshmen. Sophomores may take the course based on teacher recommendation and space available.

Prerequisites: Placement test scores, challenge test, previous grades, and departmental recommendation.

9655 AP BIOLOGY (HP)

AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students cultivate their understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the core scientific principles, theories and processes governing living organisms and biological systems. The curriculum is divided into four Big Ideas:

  1. Evolution and Biodiversity
  2. Energy and Homeostasis
  3. Transmission of Heritable Information
  4. Biological Interactions

To accommodate the rigorous laboratory program, one regular class meeting is extended by one hour each week. The course prepares students for the Advance Placement Biology Exam held in May.

This course is taught every other year, alternating with AP Chemistry. It will be offered during the 2017-2018 and the 2019-2020 school years.

Prerequisites: A- or higher in Chemistry (both semesters) or B- or higher in Honors Chemistry (both semesters).

3312 CHEMISTRY

This lab-oriented course gives students a broad introduction to the nature of the chemical world. It is designed to help students relate chemical principles and concepts developed from experimental observation and data to phenomena in daily life as well as in the laboratory. Traditional topics of high school chemistry including reaction stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, atomic structure, periodic table, and acid/base chemistry are covered in enough depth to prepare students for further studies in chemistry. One short research project is required during the first semester.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in both semesters of Algebra I (one year course), Geometry or Algebra II. B- or higher in both semesters of Environmental Science, Biology or Accelerated Biology.

3313 HONORS CHEMISTRY (HP)

This is a challenging course involving the exploration of chemistry through laboratory and lecture. Topics covered include atomic structure, the periodic table, electron configuration, chemical reaction stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid/base chemistry. This course is designed for the student with a keen interest in science who is considering a technical field of study at the university level.

Prerequisites: Placement by application and test with a B- or higher in both semesters of Biology and Algebra I (one year course).

3315 AP CHEMISTRY (HP)

Advanced Placement Chemistry is a year-long course designed to be taken after the first-year high school chemistry course. The AP Chemistry course differs from the usual first high school course in chemistry with respect to the kind of textbook used, the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles, and the kind of laboratory work done by students. Topics such as the structure of matter, kinetic theory of gases, chemical equilibria, chemical kinetics, and the basic concepts of thermodynamics are presented in considerable depth in the AP Chemistry course. To accommodate the rigorous laboratory program, one regular class meeting is extended by one hour each week. The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Chemistry Exam held in May.

This course is taught every other year, alternating with AP Biology. It will be offered during the 2018-2019 and the 2020-2021 school years.

Prerequisites: A- or higher in Chemistry (both semesters) or B- or higher in Honors Chemistry (both semesters).

3412 PHYSICS

This lab-oriented course deals with the relationship between matter and energy. The forms of energy that are studied include kinematics, mechanics, circular motion, heat, wave motion, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear energy. There is a heavy emphasis on the mathematical relationships within physics, but without the use of advanced trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on how physics relates to everyday life. Outside reading is required.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in both semesters of Algebra I (one year course), Geometry or Algebra II. B- or higher in both semesters of Environmental Science, Biology or Accelerated Biology.

3415 HONORS PHYSICS (HP)

This lab-oriented course deals with the relationship between matter and energy. The forms of energy that are studied include kinematics, mechanics, circular motion, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear energy. Strong emphasis is placed mathematical relationships with physics and students are expected to solve complicated math problems. Outside reading and extensive projects are required.

Prerequisites: A- or higher in Chemistry (both semesters) or B- or higher in Honors Chemistry (both semesters).

3540 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

This lab-oriented course introduces fundamental concepts of ecology, energy, and chemistry with applications to a wide variety of contemporary concerns. It is designed to help students relate ecological principles and concepts developed from experimental observation and data to phenomena in the natural environment and in the laboratory. Field trips and hands-on experiments utilize critical-thinking skills and the scientific method to explore and investigate global environmental issues. By the conclusion of the course, students will have a working knowledge of contemporary environmental concerns and innovative solutions and be equipped to make hard choices for the future.

Prerequisites: C- or higher in Biology.

3450 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This lab-oriented course introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Using the basic principles of chemical and biological processes, students are able to study major topics such as homeostasis, nutrition, genetics, and the organ systems of the human body. This course is designed for students who are interested in pursuing a career in the medical field or in other related life sciences. Students are required to perform laboratory and other hands-on activities.

Prerequisites: C- or higher in Chemistry and departmental approval. This course placement is first reserved for Seniors, Juniors are accepted as space allows.

9647 INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS MEDICINE

This class will prepare students for athletic training and will also give them the opportunity to learn about other careers in sports medicine such as team physician, physical therapy, strength and conditioning coach, etc. The students will be learning the basic anatomy to help with injury recognition, evaluation and rehabilitation. The students will become CPR certified with AED training; learn taping, wrapping, bracing, splinting, spine boarding and emergency triage. 50 hours of outside participation is required. These hours count as work experience and can be used for application in any college athletic training program.

Prerequisites: 2.5 cumulative GPA and a B in Biology (both semesters). Subject to instructor’s approval. 11th and 12th grade elective.

Social Studies

5211 FUNDAMENTAL COLLEGE PREP WORLD HISTORY

Fundamental College Prep World History will emphasize reading and writing strategies to examine history and geography of world civilizations from the Renaissance until today. This course is designed to explore the major historical, political, economic, social, and cultural themes in modern world history and how these themes have influenced our world today. Historians investigate how and why things happen in society. Historians draw from primary and secondary sources to understand how the past influences the present. Students in tenth grade will learn how to research, reason, and communicate like a historian. They collect evidence from multiple sources to try to develop a better understanding of the world.

After reviewing the quality and credibility of their sources, they develop an overarching story about people and events. This class will emphasize the importance of critical thinking, reading with a purpose, selecting credible information, weighing multiple perspectives, debate and discussion, writing effectively, and constructing an argument. Students will be expected to perform individual work and participate in group work.

Prerequisites: All Sophomores must take either FCP World History, CP World History or AP World History.

5212 COLLEGE PREP WORLD HISTORY

The College Prep World History builds on students' reading and writing skills and focus on historical skill development.

World History is a full-year course that examines history and geography of world civilizations from the Renaissance until today. This course is designed to explore the major historical, political, economic, social, and cultural themes in modern world history and how these themes have influenced our world today. Historians investigate how and why things happen in society. Historians draw from primary and secondary sources to understand how the past influences the present. Students in tenth grade will learn how to research, reason, and communicate like a historian. They collect evidence from multiple sources to try to develop a better understanding of the world After reviewing the quality and credibility of their sources, they develop an overarching story about people and events. This class will emphasize the importance of critical thinking, reading with a purpose, selecting credible information, weighing multiple perspectives, debate and discussion, writing effectively, and constructing an argument. Students will be expected to perform individual work and participate in group work.

Prerequisites: All Sophomores must take either FCP World History, CP World History or AP World History.

5225 AP WORLD HISTORY (HP)

This college-level course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to pass the World History Advanced Placement test in the spring. Students are challenged to engage in in-depth discussions, to read and interpret primary and secondary sources, to write essays, and to research and report on historical topics. Students may receive college credit depending on their score on the Advanced Placement test.

Prerequisites: A- or B- in English I, Science, and Religious Studies, an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher, and an approved application from the Social Studies department. This course is also available to upper-division students. All Sophomores must take either World History or AP World History.

5312 UNITED STATES HISTORY

This course is a college prep survey of United States History that explores the development of a variety of historical themes such as continuity and change through time and the cause and effect that is prevalent from the inception of the U.S. to the modern era. The foundation of the class is built upon critical reading, analysis of a range of primary source documents and communicating concepts in a coherent written form. Particular attention is given to identifying social, political and economic patterns which are fundamental concepts further developed in Senior-level Civics and Economics.

Prerequisites: All Juniors must take either US History or AP US History.

5314 AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (HP)

This college-level course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to pass the United States History Advanced Placement test in the spring. Students are challenged to engage in indepth discussions, to read and interpret primary and secondary sources, to write essays, and to research and report on historic topics. Students may receive college credit depending on their score on the Advanced Placement exam.

Prerequisites: A- or B- in English II, science, and religious studies; overall GPA of 3.0 or higher, and an approved application from the Social Studies department. All Juniors must take either US History or AP US History.

5510 CIVICS

This course is designed to develop students into active citizens. Students will study and discuss voting laws, the workings of the Congress, the Presidency, and the Judiciary. Students see how political principles are related to the life of a citizen.

Prerequisites: All Seniors must take either Civics and Economics or AP US Government and Economics.

5550 ECONOMICS

This semester-long course focuses on the current economic system used in the United States. Students investigate the key components that make up our national economy, focusing on the role of American citizens within the economy. Topics to be discussed include competition for jobs, financial support of the government, and everyday interactions with supply and demand. Other areas covered include international trade, government intervention, the federal budget, and monetary policy.

Prerequisites: All Seniors must take either Civics and Economics or AP US Government and Economics.

5560 AP GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (UNITED STATES)

AP Government and Politics (US) introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning assess causes and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence-based arguments.

Students in this college level course will study the American Political System and prepare to take the Advanced Placement test. This semester long AP Course is taught as a yearlong course in conjunction with Economics (5550) to better prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam. In addition, students will study the basics of Economics, with a focus on the role of Economics in the current US Economy. Course content is taught in modules and rotates between US Government and Economics. As a result, students will not be allowed to drop the class.

An honors point is awarded for the first semester of AP Government but not for the second semester.

Prerequisites: B or better in World History and US History.

5540 PSYCHOLOGY

This course is an introduction to psychological perspectives on human behavior. Through the completion of three projects, students are introduced to theories relating to major topic areas such as cognition and memory, sport psychology, personality development, psychological disorders, gender, and social interactions. Supplementary reading, essay writing, research, and reporting on psychological topics are required.

Prerequisites: Open only to Juniors and Seniors.

5565 ETHNIC STUDIES

This semester-long survey course examines the diverse cultures that make up present-day America. Emphasis is placed on the history and culture of a variety of groups. The course, while considering the ethnic backgrounds of all Americans, focuses special attention on those Americans of African, Asian, and Latin descent as models of people’s struggles for identity. Emphasis also is placed on those elements of various cultures that can be used to unite Americans. The importance of the contributions of men and women who comprise these diverse groups is carefully examined.

Prerequisites: Open only to Juniors and Seniors.

Visual and Performing Arts

7500 ART I

This is an introductory art course designed to encourage visual exploration and broaden horizons in the search for personal expression. The elements and principles of design are emphasized through every project with required textbook readings. Technical skills are built through the use of specific art materials and processes.

Prerequisites: Fee for art materials is $50.00.

7530 ART II

This is an advanced-level art course designed to build on students’ prior skills and experiences with the elements and principles of design. Technical skills are built through the use of specific art materials and processes.

Prerequisites: Completion of Art I with a grade of B- or higher and departmental approval. Fee for art materials is $50.00

7600 CERAMICS I

This class is designed for students who have an interest in working with clay and gives students experiences in making functional as well as sculptural pieces, using a variety of techniques. Well thought out forms, designs and functional uses along with good craftsmanship are emphasized. Students will create works of art in clay utilizing the processes of hand building using coils and slabs as well as wheel throwing, learn to make a glaze using raw chemicals according to a recipe, glaze their projects and learn about the method used to fire their works.

Prerequisites: Art I. Fee for art materials is $50.00.

7610 CERAMICS II

Ceramics II continues and extends the techniques and skills learned in Ceramics I. Students will challenge themselves with larger, more complicated and detailed projects than those completed in Ceramics I. Techniques will include vessel construction, including hand building techniques, as well as additive and subtractive sculpting. Students will be expected to show initiative, creativity and originality in the design and construction of their projects. Art history and art criticism will be included.

Prerequisites: Ceramics I and fee for art materials is $50.00.

7550 AP STUDIO ART (HP)

This course is intended for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art. In addition to class time, students will work outside the classroom, have summer assignments, maintain a sketchbook or journal, create a body of work, and have ongoing critiques with the instructor. The AP Studio Art course is equivalent to a full-year college course and focuses on “portfolio assessment.” Students submit portfolios to the College Board in AP Studio Art for evaluation at the end of the school year.

Prerequisites: Art II, an existing portfolio, and approval of instructor. Fee for art materials is $50.00.

7900 INTRODUCTORY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

This class aims to expose students to the foundational principals, concepts, and mechanics of collaborative music through the applied medium of a wind ensemble. Participants will compile a set of skills through individual discipline and group cooperation. By learning the rudiments of musical practice and performance, Introductory Wind Ensemble members will be pursuing skills in leadership, personal accountability, creative and critical thinking, personal expression, and teamwork.

Students will become proficient in the pillars of music, including a sound understanding of musical structure and notation, deciphering of basic rhythms, and the individual techniques of applied instruments and their roles in the ensemble. With emphasis on personal accountability, students will become proficient in the skills of musical preparation, personal practice techniques, ensemble rehearsal techniques and etiquette, as well as understanding the historical and contextual settings of performance material. The Wind Ensemble will give a minimum of two concerts each school year. Additional performances may be seasonal, competitive, or in support of other organizations and/or functions within the school. Attendance at all rehearsals and concerts is mandatory.

Prerequisites: Prior musical experience is beneficial; however it is not mandatory. Students may use their own musical instrument or rent from the instructor for a small fee.

7905 INTERMEDIATE INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

This class aims to expose students to the foundational principals, concepts, and mechanics of collaborative music through the applied medium of a wind ensemble. Participants will compile a set of skills through individual discipline and group cooperation. By learning the rudiments of musical practice and performance, Introductory Wind Ensemble members will be pursuing skills in leadership, personal accountability, creative and critical thinking, personal expression, and teamwork.

Students will become proficient in the pillars of music, including a sound understanding of musical structure and notation, deciphering of basic rhythms, and the individual techniques of applied instruments and their roles in the ensemble. With emphasis on personal accountability, students will become proficient in the skills of musical preparation, personal practice techniques, ensemble rehearsal techniques and etiquette, as well as understanding the historical and contextual settings of performance material. The Wind Ensemble will give a minimum of two concerts each school year. Additional performances may be seasonal, competitive, or in support of other organizations and/or functions within the school. Attendance at all rehearsals and concerts is mandatory.

Prerequisites: Introductory Instrumental Music or teacher recommendation. Prior musical experience is beneficial; however it is not mandatory. Students may use their own musical instrument or rent from the instructor for a small fee.

7710 THEATRE ARTS I

In this quickly paced class, students will learn basic acting techniques and strategies through games, scene work, and ensemble discussion. Instructional units will focus on vocal variety, character status, atmosphere, and projection. Students will also encounter roleplaying Production game that features activities that represent a full, community production. The ensemble will also perform in the Festival of the Arts in May.

Prerequisites: None

7720 THEATRE ARTS II

In this highly demanding performance ensemble, students commit to full participation in the ensemble for three major productions (November, February, May). Ensemble members will audition for, perform in, and evaluate all three productions. Beyond acting, duties include lighting and sound design, costumes and make-up, set building and painting, publicity, and budgeting. Students with heavy extracurricular commitments must be able to commit fully to the ensemble in times of conflict. This class is for advanced students who want to focus on the challenge of live Theatre as their primary activity on campus.

Prerequisites: Audition or teacher approval.

7730 THEATRE ARTS III

This course is a continuation of Theatre Arts I and II, which serve as introductory and intermediate courses to theater as a collaborative art form that incorporates the creative contributions of several players, such as: the playwright, the actor, the director, the designer, and the technician. This advanced level course allows students to gain further perspective on the crucial role that each individual plays in theatrical productions with particular emphasis on the creative/technical roles. Throughout this advanced course, students will continue to work on a variety of acting techniques and drama concepts, including physical expression, vocal expression, improvisation, character motivation. One major objective of this course is to improve students’ abilities as readers and viewers of drama. This course continues to build an appreciation and understanding for the theatre arts, both as a practitioner and as an informed audience member who is well versed in the language of theater.

Theatre Arts II and III are taught concurrently.

Prerequisites: Audition or teacher approval.

7850 CONCERT CHOIR

This class is open to all students, grades 10-12. Singers learn to sing correctly, with proper breathing technique and posture. As a result of this habitual practice, students become more disciplined in their approach to music. Students gain the ability to read music through the learning of music theory. The students learn and develop an appreciation for a variety of styles of music in a variety of languages. Concert Choir students take pride in their achievements and perform in three concerts during the school year: Fall, Christmas, and Spring.

Prerequisites: None

7810 CHORISTERS I

This is an advanced music course. Students continue their work on proper breathing technique, posture, and music theory while taking on the challenge of more complex choral repertoire. Repertoire ranges from 4- to 8-part harmony, and covers a wide variety of styles, cultures, and languages. Choristers takes a more in-depth approach to this challenging music, such as interpreting the structure of the song and the composer’s intent. Choristers functions as a team. Students work together, take pride in their achievements, and happily share this with their families, friends, and communities through concerts and other performances. This class performs in at least three concerts a year and goes on tour during the spring semester.

Prerequisites: Concert Choir (preferred), Men’s Choir, or Women’s Choir, plus an audition.

7820 CHORISTERS II

Choristers II builds on Concert Choir and Choristers I. This course provides opportunities for students to further develop their musical potential and aesthetic understanding through singing in an advanced choral ensemble. Study includes the continued care and cultivation of a beautiful tone, while implementing proper vocal technique within the choral setting. Students will develop intermediate and advanced musicianship skills related to music literacy, aural skills, theoretical analysis, and the appropriate usage of music terminology. Attention will also be given to relating their music experiences to the time period and culture of the diverse pieces they study, as well as to contemporary society.

Choristers I and Choristers II are taught concurrently.

Prerequisites: Choristers I.

7865 WOMEN’S CHOIR

This class is open to all female students, grades 9-12. Singers learn to sing correctly with proper breathing technique and posture. As a result of this habitual practice, students become more disciplined in their approach to music. Students learn and develop an appreciation for a variety of styles of music in a variety of languages. Women’s Choir meets once a week after school. In order to receive credit for the course, students must participate in all performances as well as maintain good weekly attendance for the semester.

Prerequisites: None.

*This course is generally offered as a yearlong extracurricular activity. Students receive 2.5 units of non-academic credit.

9671 MEN’S CHOIR

This choir is open to all male students, grades 9-12. Singers learn how to sing correctly with proper breathing technique and posture. As a result of this habitual practice, students become more disciplined in their approach to music. Students learn and develop an appreciation for a variety of styles of music in a variety of languages. Men’s Choir meets once a week after school. In order to receive credit for the course, students must participate in all performances as well as maintain good weekly attendance for the semester.

Prerequisites: None

*This course is generally offered as a yearlong extracurricular activity. Students receive 2.5 units of non-academic credit.

7835 HANDBELL CHOIR

This choir is open to all male students, grades 9-12. Singers learn how to sing correctly with proper breathing technique and posture. As a result of this habitual practice, students become more disciplined in their approach to music. Students learn and develop an appreciation for a variety of styles of music in a variety of languages. Men’s Choir meets once a week after school. In order to receive credit for the course, students must participate in all performances as well as maintain good weekly attendance for the semester.

Prerequisites: Ability to read music (preferred) or previous experience on handbells or other instruments. Student must consult with teacher prior to requesting the class.

*This course is generally offered as a yearlong extracurricular activity. Students receive 2.5 units of non-academic credit that does not satisfy the Visual and Performing Arts requirement for UC/CSU.

7875 JAZZ CHOIR

This is an advanced, audition-only small ensemble performing complex arrangements of both traditional and nontraditional vocal jazz music. Singers work together to accomplish a quality blend (usually with individual microphones) and the correct “feel” to understand the elements of jazz and to interpret vocal jazz arrangements with integrity. They explore many styles of jazz: Latin, be-bop, swing, Afro-Cuban as well as the roots of vocal jazz (blues, gospel, and call-and-response). Individually, students work on jazz scat-singing and solo improvisation to bring their level of proficiency and understanding of jazz to its highest potential. The Vocal Jazz Choir participates in school concerts throughout the year, as well as the tour and jazz festivals during the spring semester. Vocal Jazz Choir meets once a week after school. In order to receive credit for the course, students must participate in all performances, as well as maintain good weekly attendance for the semester.

Prerequisites: Choristers (preferred), Concert Choir, Men’s Choir, or Women’s Choir, plus an audition.

*This course is generally offered as a yearlong extracurricular activity. Students receive 2.5 units of non-academic credit.

World Languages

4122 FRENCH I

This course introduces students to listening, speaking, reading and writing in French. A basic vocabulary and the most common language patterns are taught. Cultural information related to the Francophone world is emphasized. French 1 learning includes: oral presentations, video projects, games, and other interactive activities. Course is required to be eligible for the SPSV France trip.

Prerequisites: None.

4222 FRENCH II

In this course the skills introduced in French 1 are developed further with the purpose of preparing students for Pre-AP speaking, reading, writing and listening. More extensive vocabulary and more complex grammatical forms are introduced. Special emphasis placed on project-based learning including multimedia presentations on holidays, create-your-own amusement park, French/Francophone art, and more.

Prerequisites: C- or higher in French I or departmental approval.

4322 FRENCH III

In this course students strengthen and expand previous lexical and grammatical constructs. Students are encouraged to apply their conversational skills to topics of personal or practical interest. A diverse selection of readings (children’s books, comic strips, news articles, etc.) are used. Students are required to research, prepare, and present multiple media interactive media projects on Francophone culture. Special emphasis on creative writing projects and the study of Le Petit Prince. This course is conducted in French.

Prerequisites: C- or higher in French II or departmental approval.

4322 FRENCH III HONORS

Students complete the coursework of French III at an accelerated rate. Reading, projects, essays, and oral presentations are completed in preparation for the AP French Language and Culture course. Special emphasis on creative writing projects and the study of Le Petit Prince. Students are expected to produce high quality, honorslevel work. The course is conducted in French.

Prerequisites: B+ or higher in French II and departmental approval.

4422 FRENCH IV

Communication skills are given special emphasis. Difficult areas of grammar are reviewed, and vocabulary is increased through reading and writing. Authentic literary, historical, and cultural readings are used with an emphasis on current events and themes. This course is conducted in French.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in French III or departmental approval.

4522 AP FRENCH

This course develops and refines language skills through the exploration of six broad themes of contemporary French culture. Students will review and master complex grammar, verb tenses, and idioms by engaging with authentic materials. Students participate in discussions, compose analytical essays, and deliver oral presentations to improve language skills and prepare for the AP French exam. An AP French Language and Culture Guide is used for preparation. This course is conducted in French.

Prerequisites: B- or higher in French III Honors or A- in French III or departmental approval.

4001 MANDARIN CHINESE I

Mandarin 1 is an introductory course for non-Chinese speaking students who until now have had little in-depth exposure to the intricacies of the Mandarin Chinese language and the cultures of Chinese-speaking countries. The main objective of Mandarin 1 is to develop a strong foundation in the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Focus will be on developing student speaking and listening skills, pronunciation and proper grammar usage in high-frequency common communicative settings, such as introductory greetings, family descriptions, time, hobbies and home etiquette. Students will also be able to accurately write and depict Chinese characters (Hanzi), effectively develop their phonetic understanding of Hanyu Pinyin and begin to associate the tonal qualities of Mandarin Chinese into their pronunciation.

Prerequisites: None. Subject to sufficient enrollment.

4112 SPANISH I

This course is designed to welcome students into language learning. It provides a solid foundation in structures and vocabulary and common language patterns in the Spanish language. It also provides practice for listening, speaking, reading, writing. Students will study seven Hispanic countries and their cultures and will make connections and comparisons between their cultural experience and the cultural experience of teenagers in the Hispanic countries. Another goal of this course is to help the students recognize that they are participants in multilingual communities at home and in other countries around the world.

Prerequisites: None

4212 SPANISH II

Spanish II is designed to further student’s language proficiency. Students review and incorporate key concepts from Spanish I, but are exposed to more complex vocabulary and grammatical lessons. New instruction includes learning how to speak and write in the Past Tense (both Preterite and Imperfect). Students will also increase their own use of the Target Language through more conversational group/partner work, and they will also complete more advanced projects such as short essays and oral presentations in front of the class. Students will gain all the tools necessary to be successful in future Spanish courses at SPSV and beyond.

Prerequisites: 70% or higher in Spanish I and Departmental Recommendation, or Challenge Test.

4213 SPANISH II ACCELERATED

Spanish II Honors is a class that incorporates many of the same concepts as Spanish II, however, while the Honors class may utilize the same textbook series as Spanish II, the pacing of the class is noticeably faster paced. As a result, students will be exposed to advanced grammar such as the Subjunctive that will not be new to them once they reach the Spanish III level. Additionally, this course is taught exclusively in Spanish with the lone exception of instruction of especially difficult grammatical concepts. Students will also use the Target Language at a higher level than the standard Spanish II course, and their projects will be more in-depth and push their creativity to a higher degree. This course is a wonderful way to help ensure that students will be successful in Spanish III Honors and any other advanced courses such as AP Spanish.

Prerequisites: 90% or higher in Spanish I and Departmental Recommendation, or Challenge Test.

4312 SPANISH III

This course designed for students who wish to continue their Spanish journey beyond this basic 2 year requirement. It is also an ideal course for any student planning on attending a four-year college, as many universities now require (or strongly advise) applicants to complete at least three years of World Language studies. This course reviews concepts learned in both Spanish I and Spanish II, while also introducing increasingly challenging vocabulary as well as grammatical concepts. Students are expected to use the Target Language more frequently than in lower division courses, and the class is taught exclusively in Spanish with the exception of instruction of highly complicated grammatical lessons. Students will do extensive conversational work with groups/partners, and will have the chance to write full length essays and give longer oral presentations. There is also a heightened exposure to cultural information (art, literature, etc.) when compared to the more introductory classes. This is also a key course for any student who is interested in taking a fourth level course at SPSV such as Spanish IV or AP Spanish.

Prerequisites: 70% or higher in Spanish II and departmental recommendation or challenge test.

4313 SPANISH III HONORS

This course is designed to further students’ progress in the skills taught in Spanish II or Honors Spanish II while studying more complex grammatical structures and emphasizing creative writing and oral presentations. Additionally, there will be an introduction to higher level reading skills that allow for enjoyment of authentic forms of written Spanish such as short stories, news articles and blogs. This class is taught exclusively in Spanish with the exception of highly complicated grammatical lessons. Students will do extensive conversational work with groups/partners. It is an ideal course for any student planning on attending a four-year college, as many universities now require (or strongly advise) applicants to complete at least three years of World Language studies. This is a key course for any student who is interested in taking a fourth level course at SPSV such as Spanish IV or AP Spanish.

Prerequisites: 90% or higher in Spanish II or 85% or higher in Honors Spanish II and departmental approval.

4412 SPANISH IV

Spanish Four is designed to further students’ progress in in the development of the four language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) while deepening their knowledge of into Hispanic culture through readings and online research. The course emphasizes authentic and relevant use of Spanish in a contemporary context. This course enables students to become bilingual and help them better prepare for the job market. The course is interactive to best facilitate all communication skills. This course is conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisites: 75% or higher in Spanish III Honors or Spanish III or departmental approval

4512 AP SPANISH

AP Spanish is specifically designed for students taking the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam. Students continue to discover, learn, and use language in relevant, creative, and contemporary contexts. Students’ proficiency in the four skill areas will be strengthened through authentic readings, as well as grammatical review.

AP Spanish emphasizes communication (understanding and being understood by others) by applying interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational skills in real life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies, and cultural awareness. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught entirely in Spanish.

Prerequisites: 80% or higher in Spanish III Honors or 90% or higher in Spanish III, completion of Spanish IV or departmental approval.

4513 SPANISH V

This course provides increased opportunities for the comprehension of Spanish in formal and informal settings, continued practice in complex ideas and implications of language acquisition, and the reading of various types of authentic and prepared texts. Students are helped to develop a more refined writing style that allows for creativity and individual expression in Spanish. Students will prepare final projects instead of taking a final exam. This class is offered as an independent study class with weekly meetings with a teacher.

Prerequisites: Completion of Spanish IV or AP Spanish or departmental approval.

International Course Offering

8650 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE I

Beginning with a review of basic reading comprehension strategies and skills, such as scanning and skimming, students are introduced to searching for more complex, inferential layers of meaning. They will learn to evaluate sources to predict information in the reading, identify basic stylistic devices and develop a sensibility to the author’s tone.

Using activities and prompts from the text, students learn how to summarize and synthesize information from up to three different sources. They work on expanding their scholarly vocabulary and incorporating it in their speech. Writing skills are developed to a level sufficient to produce coherent multi-paragraph answers to writing prompts with minimum support as well as to produce basic essays with support. Teachers expect the students to express opinions on the subjects and select evidence to support them as they work toward constructing logical arguments.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in the SPSV International program, Placement test. (Required).

8655 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE II

In level 2 of Language and Culture, student’s master pre-reading and active reading skills and strategies, with teachers empowering them to work independently with high school and first year college-level academic texts. Students learn to identify the author’s rhetorical purpose and the structural and stylistic devices the author uses to achieve it. Each chapter presents three readings that discuss an engaging academic realm from various perspectives.

The readings vary significantly in terms of content and language: from the role of social media during the Arab Spring to an interview with Leo Tolstoy recorded on film; from a personal essay about home to a scientific study on the human brain. Course assignments require students to synthesize information from multiple sources and evaluate overall context for better understanding. The assignments require students to be open to alternative viewpoints as they shape their own spoken and written arguments. Ultimately, the students work toward an understanding of writing conventions and styles and can write to narrate, describe, explain or persuade. Each unit is designed to provide topics of interest so that students can improve English proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, listening and culture.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in the SPSV International program, Placement test. (Required).

8660 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE III

Upon completion of this course, the students’ English language skills advance to the degree that they are able to confidently express themselves in social and scholastic settings. The reading selections offer a wide array of genres and forms and the topics are subjective or controversial. Students understand the literal meaning by using critical thinking and reading strategies and make inferences based on the text and critically evaluate information.

Students complete independent research, define their own position on a given topic and, upon careful consideration of all viewpoints, construct an effective argument and identify appropriate means to communicate their message effectively. The course also teaches students to adjust their speaking and writing to the needs of the audience and rhetorical purpose. Each unit is designed to provide topics of interest so that the students can develop English proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, listening and culture.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in the SPSV International program, Placement test. (Required).

8665 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE IV

Upon completion of this course, the students’ English language skills advance to the degree that they are able to confidently express themselves in social and scholastic settings at a early college level. The reading selections offer a variety of genres and topics meant to encourage discussion. Students develop critical thinking skills and sharpen their skills in formulating ideas, expressing them and debating

Through the readings, students become more familiar with college level content and course work. The topics discussed and researched are intended to prepare students for college level courses on the social sciences. These units set the foundation for understanding complex vocabulary and fostering classroom discussions. The course also teaches students to adjust their speaking and writing to perform at a college level. This includes debate, and presentation skills.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in the SPSV International program, Placement test. (Required).

COLLEGE ADVANCE

College Advance is an option available to international students who have demonstrated higher levels of proficiency in English. Returning juniors and seniors with a high level of English proficiency are selected to participate in this innovative program, which is presented in a flipped format. This series of two unique courses emphasizes listening comprehension, critical reading and writing skills with a focus on the college admissions process and future academic success.

Students access reading and video course content online, study it on their own schedule and later meet with the course instructor online, to discuss the material. The flipped learning model enables students to take full advantage of the other course offerings and extra-curricular activities at their school.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in the SPSV International program. Open to Juniors and Seniors only.

*UC approval pending

Non-Departmental

8645 ACADEMIC EDGE

This course provides valuable skills needed for a successful transition into high school. Topics explored will include study skills (time management, organization skills, and preparation for tests/exams). Special emphasis will be placed on college prep writing. Focused, small-group study sessions provided by academic teachers of various subjects and the course instructor are an integral component of this course. In addition, students will follow a college-going curriculum guide, Realizing the College Dream.

Prerequisites: 9th Grade enrollment based on data gathered in the admissions process.

*10 units of Non-Academic Credits

8620 YEARBOOK I

In this basic class, students learn and execute the fundamentals of producing the manual aspects of a quality yearbook. Students study the first stages of the yearbook with layouts, photography, journalism pieces, and artwork. Students in Yearbook I constitute the yearbook staff. Homework is a daily requirement. This course is held on Mondays at lunchtime and other days as needed. This course uses online software provided by the yearbook company. This course has a limited enrollment of 20 students.

Prerequisites: None.

8640 YEARBOOK II

In this advanced continuation of Yearbook I, students produce layouts, written hard copy, and computer hard copy. Students master proofreading, layout, and corrections. Students adhere to deadlines and hold brainstorming sessions with Yearbook I students. They are responsible for the production of a quality yearbook. The course is held on Mondays at lunchtime and other days as needed. The course uses online software provided by the yearbook company. This course has a limited enrollment of 10 students

Prerequisites: Yearbook I with a B- or higher.

8710 LEADERSHIP CLASS

This class is designed for students to develop the skills and apply the leadership and organizational theories introduced at SPSV Summer Leadership Camp. Students facilitate the creative planning, execution, and evaluation of school events. They also present to the adult community student concerns and ideas for change. ASB officers and Class Officers meet together twice weekly. Representatives from campus clubs and Spirit Squad are encouraged to attend these meetings. The three Campus Ministry teams (Liturgy, Retreat, and Service) each have their own weekly leadership meeting.

Prerequisites: Election or appointment to office or position, SPSV Summer Leadership Camp, and 2.0 GPA.

*Up to 10 units of Non-Academic Credits

9210 TEACHER/OFFICE AIDE

This is a semester-long commitment between the student and a teacher or secretary of his choice. The teacher indicates specific requirements for the aide which address unique needs. Only juniors and seniors will receive credit as aides. Aides attend the full class period each day, perform the tasks outlined by the teacher, and have passed the subject level. Credits for this course are over and above graduation requirement credits.

Prerequisites: Students must receive approval from the teacher.

9230 LIBRARY AIDE

This is a semester-long commitment between the student and the librarian. The librarian directs the student in library procedures including helping teachers and peers find research materials, using the automated library system for circulation, and maintaining an accurate library inventory in an online environment. Only juniors and seniors may receive credit as aides. Aides must be present in the library for the full class period each day. Credits for this course are over and above graduation requirement credits.

Prerequisites: Students must receive approval from the Assistant Principal.

9245 COMPARATIVE CULTURES

Students who complete an educational travel program abroad may receive five credits for fifty-four hours or more of travel-study. They must complete a five-page report on an approved topic and keep a daily journal detailing the spiritual, historical, architectural, artistic, literary, and cultural points of interest. The report and journal are due for submission to the Assistant Principal for Academic Services on the Friday of the first week of school.

Prerequisites:None.